T.E.R:R.A.I.N - Taranaki Educational Resource: Research, Analysis and Information Network


Pinus canariensis (Canary Islands Pine)

Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Pinophyta
Class: Pinopsida
Order: Pinales
Family: Pinaceae
Genus: Pinus
Subgenus: Pinus
Species: P. canariensis
Binomial name: Pinus canariensis
Coimmon names: Canary Pine, Canary Islands Pine

Pinus canariensis is a is a species of gymnosperm in the coniferous family Pinaceae species whose natural habitat is restricted to five of the Canary Islands in the Atlantic Ocean. It is interesting that tree's extremely long needles make a significant contribution to the islands water supply, trapping large amounts of condensation from the moist air coming off the Atlantic with the prevailing north eastern wind (locally called "alisios"). The condensation then drops to the ground and is quickly absorbed by the soil, eventually percolating down to the underground aquifers.

Pinus canariensis is a large evergreen tree, growing to >60 m tall with a straight stem and 100–120 cm diameter trunk. The bark is very thick, scaly, fissured, patterned red-brown and buff.
Young branchlets are stout,, usually brownish, glabrous, 6-15 mm wide. A characteristic of the species is the occurrence of glaucous (bluish-green) epicormic shoots growing from the lower trunk.
The fine, long, green to yellow-green leaves are needle-like, in fascicles of 3 and are 20–30 cm long. The long needles hang under down their own weight off of the trees upward pointing branches. This gives this species of tree a distinctive appearance. The 1 mm wide leaves (needles) have finely toothed margins and lines of stomata on all surfaces. The needle’s sheath is persistent and is 14-21 mm long.
The male cones are clustered at the ends of lower shoots, opening up to be yellow, releasing lots of pollen.
The mature, glossy brown or red-brown female cones are hard, heavy, ovoid-conic and are >18 cm long and >13 cm wide. The cones scales have no prickle. The cones backward pointing on the branches and they opening readily when mature in 2 years.

  

Male cones of Pinus canariensis. Male cones are clustered at the ends of lower shoots, opening up to be yellow, releasing lots of pollen. After these fall off there spaces on the branch without any leaves. 


Male cones of Pinus canariensis

Young female cones


Mature female cone. These dry and open realising winged seeds.


The bark is extremely thick, reddish, with small flaky plates separated by shallow furrows.
 

A characteristic of the species is the occurrence of glaucous (bluish-green) epicormic shoots growing from the lower trunk.
 

Thanks to Wikipedia for text and information: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/