T.E.R:R.A.I.N - Taranaki Educational Resource: Research, Analysis and Information Network


Beetle (Longhorn Burnt Pine) Arhopalus tristis

Phylum: Arthropoda 
Subphylum: Uniramia 
Class: Insecta 
Order: Coleoptera 
Family: Cerambycidae 
Subfamily: Spondylidinae
Genus: Arhopalus 
Tribe: Asemini 
Scientific name: Arhopalus tristis
Common name: Burnt Pine Longhorn Beetle

Arhopalus tristis is a large beetle, 25–30 mm native to Europe, northern Asia (except Japan), and northern Africa. It was accidentally introduced into New Zealand, probably in the mid-1950s, and discovered in Northland in 1963.  It has since spread throughout the North and South Islands. Arhopolus tristis attacks logs, stumps, and standing, dead or dying pine ( Pinus ) trees, primarily the main stem as well as branches above 60 mm diameter.The larvae feed in the inner bark of dead pine trees and logs, especially those killed by fire. .
Early larval stages feed in the inner phloem, leaving irregular trails of compacted red-brown bore dust. In heavily attacked, fire-damaged trees, the phloem zone can be completely destroyed from below ground level to above 6 metres Later larval stages usually make tunnels in the outer sapwood, mostly parallel with the grain. The depth of penetration varies with the population density as well as with the age and condition of the host material. Tunnels have been recorded to a depth of 100 mm in the wood 4 months after initial attack.
Beetles also contribute to the devaluation of logs by vectoring sapstain-causing fungi such as Ophiostoma spp. This beetle can turn into a major pest because it greatly reduces the time available for salvage of burnt or dead trees where it is present.
More information can be found at http://www.nzffa.org.nz/farm-forestry-model/the-essentials/forest-health-pests-and-diseases/Pests/Arhopalus-tristis/Arhopalus-tristisEnt27

Burnt Pine Longhorn Beetle







Larvae feed in the inner bark of dead pine trees and logs, especially those killed by fire.
Concentrated egg–laying results in large numbers of larvae and rapid deterioration of logs

Sapstain from fungi (Ophiostoma spp.) vectored by A. tristis this reduces the value of any salvaged wood