T.E.R:R.A.I.N - Taranaki Educational Resource: Research, Analysis and Information Network


Gecko (Otago large) Woodworthia sp. ‘Otago large’

Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Reptilia
Order: Squamata
Family: Diplodactylidae
Genus: Woodworthia
Species: W. sp. ‘Otago large’
Scientific name: Woodworthia sp. ‘Otago large’
Synonyms: Naultinus granulatus, Naultinus pacificus, Woodworthia maculatus, Dactylocnemis pacificus
Common names: Korero gecko, Otago large gecko, Otago- Southland gecko, Danseys Pass gecko, Woodworthia ”Otago/Southland large”

Woodworthia sp. ‘Otago large’ is a nocturnal, terrestrial, indigenous, endemic gecko found in New Zealand. This is a widespread species in Otago and Southland, with three recognised colour morphs. They are nocturnal, and favour rocky outcrops, gullies with rock or log cover and sometimes they are found in forests. 
Like all New Zealand’s geckos, they are fully protected, meaning that they may only be handled, collected or kept in captivity under permit. Predation of this gecko occurs by mustelids (ferrets, weasels, stoats) rats and cats.

Woodworthia sp. ‘Otago large’ is a medium to large gecko measures up to 90 mm from snout tip to vent (opening through which the animal defecates) and they can weigh up to 17.5 g. This species is highly variable involving size, colour, build and scalation. They may be grey, olive-grey, brown, or deep pinkish-brown. There is also a considerable geographic variation of body proportions which varies from medium to very robust.
Their eyes may be grey, brown, green or yellow. The mouth colour is pink. The Woodworthia species are viviparous (live birth).
They are omnivores eating mainly eat insects, e.g. moths and flies. They also eat the berries of plants such as the Coprosma spp. and the nectar of some flowers. 
All Woodworthia species are able to ‘drop’ (autotomise) their tails. This is a predator defence mechanism—the tail continues to thrash around whilst the gecko makes its escape; the tail then regrows over the next few years.
The common name Korero is in reference to the active vocal behaviour of this species.

Photographed at Alexandra, Otago, South Island.

Distribution map.

Thanks to Wikipedia for text and information: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/