T.E.R:R.A.I.N - Taranaki Educational Resource: Research, Analysis and Information Network


Forest and Bird Restoration Project

Royal Forest & Bird Protection Society restoration project on the upper Te Henui walkway
 
Saturday 17th April  was our first working bee and was very successful thanks to the many helping hands.( see photos below).  

Tthe future dates of
Saturday 1st May , Saturday 15th May are for working bees to prepare the area for June/July plantings.   If you are interested in helping we would love you to join us.  Anytime length of time between 9am and 3pm.  You will find us along walkway south of Cumberland Street bridge. Bring gloves & drink & food as needed.
Rakes if you prefer to work with those. Weed bags provided.
Sign in with site manager Carolyn Brough on arrival.
You may park on the lawn at the entrance to the Te Henui Walkway.

Photo Sept 09 of the area now being weeded by the North Taranaki Branch, Royal Forest & Bird Protection Society


Council workers arriving to remove the weeds removed by the working bee


Weeds in wool bales


Weed pile.


Rubbish found on the banks
 
 
 
Bamboo removal completed March 2010
March saw a stand of bamboo removed as part of a Forest and Bird funded revegetation project coordinated with the N.P Council.

The funding for this project came from the Department of Conservation which gives grants for community conservation projects
 
The grant details are below
 
Project number: CCF-075
 
Project name: Upper Te Henui Walkway Restoration Project
 
Organisation: North Taranaki Branch, Royal Forest & Bird Protection Society
 
Funded: $24,055
 
Brief description: A grant of $24,055 to the North Taranaki Branch of the Royal Forest & Bird Protection Society to assist with the restoration of lowland riparian forest on the West bank of Te Henui River, New Plymouth. Specifically, the grant will assist with the removal of bamboo, pine and other exotic weeds and the purchase of native ecosourced plants to be planted by volunteers from the community.

Photos below are of the area were the bamboo stands were removed.  The river can now be seen.